Episode 4 – The Life & Death of Sir Frederick Banting

About the Episode

Ancient Egypt; the discovery of medical insulin; chemical weapons testing; a fatal plane crash; and several odd calls from CSIS. What do these events have in common with Canadian inventor, war hero, and physician Sir Frederick Banting?

In this episode, guest host Tom Van Dewark explores the fascinating life of Sir Frederick Banting, the man who discovered medical insulin and whose life could easily be the plot to a Hollywood blockbuster. Tom will dive into Banting’s famous discovery, his controversial contributions to the war effort, and finally the mystery (or, as Tom argues, conspiracy) behind his death.

Notes 

  1. If you are interested in visiting or learning more about the Banting House National Historic Site of Canada, click here.
  2. To read about Sir Frederick Banting’s artistic side, and to view some of his paintings, check out S. Lynn Fraser’s article in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Sources

Avery, Donald. “Canadian Scientists, CBW Weapons and Japan.” In Science and the Pacific War: Science and Survival in the Pacific, 1939-1945. Edited by Roy M. Macleod. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000.

Avery, Donald. The Science of War: Canadian Scientists and Allied Military Technology during the Second World War. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998.

Beebe, Shannon D. The Ultimate Weapon is no Weapon: Human Security and the New Rules of War and Peace. New York: Public Affairs, 2010.

Bliss, Michael. Banting: A Biography. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1984.

Bliss, Michael. The Discovery of Insulin: 25th Anniversary Addition. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2017.

Bryden, John. Deadly Allies: Canada’s Secret War, 1937-1937. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1989.

Cook, Tim. Fight to the Finish: Canadians Fighting in the Second World War. Toronto: Allen Lane, 2014.

Cook, Tim. The Necessary War: Canadians Fighting the Second World War. Toronto: Allen Lane, 2015.

Early Aviation in Newfoundland. Thomas M. McGrath fonds. MG31-A23. Volume 16. R7783-0-1-E. Library and Archives Canada.

Eggleston, Wilfrid. National Research in Canada: The NRC, 1916-1966. Toronto: Clarke, Irwin & Company, 1978.

Eggleston, Wilfrid. Scientists at War. London: Oxford University Press, 1950.

Goodspeed, D.J. “Biological Warfare Research in Canada in World War II.” In No Day Long Enough: Canadian Science in World War II. Edited by George R. Lindsey. Toronto: Canadian Institute of Strategic Studies, 1997.

Hartcup, Guy. The Effect of Science on the Second World War. Great Britain: Macmillan Press Ltd., 2000.

Johnson, Brian. The Secret War. New York: Methuen, 1978.

Library and Archives Canada. “Diaries of Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King.” At https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/politics-government/prime-ministers/william-lyon-mackenzie-king/Pages/diaries-william-lyon-mackenzie-king.aspx#a.

Lindsey, George R. No Day Long Enough: Canadian Science in World War II. Toronto: BBC Press, 1997.

Mackenzie, C.J. The Mackenzie-McNaughton Wartime Letters. Edited by Mel Thistle. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1975.

Mackenzie, C.J. Memorandum on Scientific and Technical War Development Work of the National Research Council. July 6, 1940. Banting House National Historic Site of Canada.

Malone, Richard S. A Portrait of War 1939-1943. Toronto: Collins, 1983.

Pennie, A.M. “Chemical Warfare Research in Canada in World War II.” In No Day Long Enough: Canadian Science in World War II. Edited by George R. Lindsey. Toronto: BBC Printing, 1997.

Reesor, J.B. “Chemical Warfare Trials and Tribulations at the Suffield Experimental Station During World War II.” In No Day Long Enough: Canadian Science in World War II. Edited by George R. Lindsey. Toronto: BBC Printing, 1997.

Credits

Producers: Robin Mullins and Emily Cuggy

Hosts: Robin Mullins, Nick Bridges, Keely McCavitt

Guest Host: Tom Van Dewark

Researcher: Tom Van Dewark

Audio Editing: Robin Mullins and Emily Cuggy

Web Content: Casandra Masse

Image Credit: Le Dr Frederick G. Banting sur la passerelle d’embarquement du SS BEOTHIC. Maurice Haycock / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada / C-066533